Original WW2 Airborne Hawley Paratrooper Liner for the M2 D-Bale Helmet

Hawley right side

WWII Airborne Hawley Paratrooper Liner

This style of WWII airborne Hawley paratrooper helmet liner was the first liner produced to go into the M2 d-bale paratrooper helmet.   They were manufactured using a pressed fiber material that feels very similar to cardboard.  Thus, they were not very sturdy and had a tendency to fall apart during use.  They were manufactured using this material because at the time it was the only material that could be easily molded into the shape of the helmet shell.

Soon after the development of the Hawley liner, a couple of new processes for helmet liners were developed using low and high pressure composite materials.  These new processes were used by companies like St. Clair and Inland for their liners.  It was not very long before production of helmet liners for the M2 paratrooper helmet was switched to these companies.

Since these Hawley paratrooper liners were manufactured for only a brief period of time and are very fragile, they are extremely rare and hard to find today.  Originals of this style of Hawley paratrooper liner are found in only a few private airborne and M1 helmet collections today.

This particular WWII Hawley paratrooper liner originally belonged to the same paratrooper who owned the M41 paratrooper jump suit I posted a few weeks ago.  He was an early member of the US Airborne forces and retained several of these early airborne items after World War Two ended.

 

Aiborne M2 D Bale Paratrooper Helmet from a 506th PIR 101st Airborne Division Veteran

Bale Paratrooper Helmet Side View

M2 D Bale Paratrooper Helmet

This original World War Two M2 D Bale Paratrooper helmet came from a  Company G, 506 PIR, 101st Airborne Division Veteran.   The Veteran received this helmet during WW2, after his previous helmet had been shot off his head by a German soldier.  He wore that helmet, with the bullet hole still in it, for awhile but was later forced to turn it in and replace it with this helmet and liner, because his First Sergeant deemed a helmet with a bullet hole as unsafe.

The M2 helmet is referred to by collectors by many several names today.  In addition to M2 and D Bale, you will hear it also referred to as a C Loop or D Bail. They are a highly desired piece of militaria today.  Since they are in high demand and are fairly hard to find, they are one of the most heavily faked and/or recreated items of US WWII militaria today.

This M2 D Bale helmet exhibits all of the classic features you like to see in an original D Bale.  It has a low heat stamp number, the male snaps that snap into the liner are chromed, and it additionally has the little single indentations on the rim of the helmet, in between the bales, that these original helmets often have.   Also, the size, shape, and construction of the bales, and the feet of the bales, is correct.  The liner is a WWII correct Westinghouse paratrooper liner and was in the helmet when it was purchased from the Veteran.

WWII 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division, Ike Jacket Uniform Grouping

319th GFA Grouping

319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division, Uniform Grouping

This World War Two 82nd Airborne Division uniform grouping belonged to a member of the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion.  It was purchased from him in the late 1980s.  He was with the 319th GFAB through all of its campaigns during WWII.  This Veteran, and the 319th GFAB, first saw action while supporting Darby’s Rangers during the invasion of Italy in September 1943.  Darby had picked the 319th GFAB to be the artillery support for his Rangers during the invasion of Italy.  The 319th GFAB saw heavy action during this campaign.

He next saw action when the 319th GFAB was landed in Normandy via gliders on D-Day, June 6, 1944.  The 319th GFAB again saw heavy action during the Normandy campaign.  The next campaign for this Veteran was Market Garden, the invasion of Holland.  This was followed by more heavy fighting during the Battle of the Bulge.  The 319th GFAB continued to deliver artillery fire against the Germans as the 82nd Airborne Division pushed into Germany, in the closing months of the War.

This grouping consists of his Ike jacket, his wool shirt, overseas cap, and some letters and documents.  After the end of the War, he spent a brief amount of time assigned to the 17th Airborne Division before being sent home.  This is the reason his shirt and Ike jacket have the 17th Airborne Division patch on the left sleeve.  His Ike jacket has the 82nd Airborne Division patch on the right sleeve indicating combat with that former unit.

His Ike jacket has the pin back, distinctive unit insignia, of the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion on the collar.  The red oval behind his glider rider wings indicates airborne artillery.  His overseas cap has the red piping used by artillery units and the cap disc is the style used by both paratroopers and glider towards the end of the War.  The ribbon bar is British made and has the arrowhead indicating participation in an invasion.  The final picture is of a letter that the Veteran included when he sold the grouping.

WWII USMC Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medal Grouping to a Former Marine Raider Wounded On Iwo Jima

WW2 USMC and USN Style of Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medal

WW2 USMC Medal Grouping to a Former Marine Raider Wounded on Iwo Jima

This World War Two USMC Purple Heart and Bronze Star medal grouping belonged to a Marine who had been a Raider, but later transferred to the Ninth Marine Regiment, Third Marine Division.  While with the 3rd Marine Division, he was wounded during the fighting on Iwo Jima.

Both the Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medal are one of the correct styles, for these medals, that the Marines and Navy used during World War Two.  The two cases are also the one of the correct styles used by the USMC and USN during the War.

The letter discussing the awarding of the Purple Heart and also the deformed bullet, were both found inside the Purple Heart case.  I have had many groupings over the years, were Veterans kept the bullet or piece of shrapnel that wounded them as a souvenir.  I am guessing that this is the case with this bullet, but unfortunately have no other information regarding the bullet.

WW2 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment Ovals and Jump Wings on 101st Airborne Paratrooper Uniforms

506th PIR Oval and Jump Wings on a G Company, 506 PIR Uniform

506th PIR Oval and Jump Wings on a G Company, 506 PIR Uniform

These original WWII 506th PIR ovals and jump wings are on uniforms that belonged to two different 506th PIR paratroopers.  This style of 506th PIR oval is the type most commonly found on WWII 506th uniforms and in groupings.

The first oval and jump wings are on a uniform that belonged to a member of Company G, 506th PIR.  The jump wings are sterling pin back wings.

The second oval and jump wings are on a uniform that belonged to a member of Company C, 506th PIR.  The jump wings are also sterling pin back wings.

The final two photos show another original WW2 506th PIR oval that is not on a uniform.  The photo of the back of the oval, shows what you want to look for on the back of these original World War Two 506 ovals.

WW2 First Marine Division Australian Made Uniform Jacket with Theater Made Patch

1st Marine Division Australian Made Jacket Front

1st Marine Division Australian Made Jacket Front

This World War Two Australian made battle dress uniform jacket belonged to a member of the 11th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division who participated in the battles on Guadalcanal, New Britain, and Peleliu.  These Aussie made jackets were very popular with members of the First Marine Division early in the war, because they were not able to obtain US made dress uniforms.

This jacket also has a theater made First Marine Division patch sewn on the right arm.  Although the US Marines normally only wore divisional patches on the left arm during WW2, period photos of these Australian made jackets being worn by members of the First Marine Division, often show the divisional patch being worn instead on the right arm.  Also, many of the surviving Aussie made First Marine Division jackets that I have examined have the patch on the right arm.

I own several of these Australian made jackets in documented groups and only one has the First Marine Division patch on the left arm, the others all have the patch on the right arm.  Interestingly, all of these groups have other patched uniform items that are later issue and are US made.  On all of the other later issue uniform items in these groups, the First Marine Division patch is on the left arm.  Period photos also reflect this trend of the divisional patch migrating from the right arm to the more conventional left arm as the members of the First Marine Division transitioned from wearing the Australian made battle dress to the US made USMC uniform.

This particular uniform also exhibits two other common traits seen on these Aussie made uniforms when worn by members of the First Marine Division.  First, although theater made EGAs (Eagle, Globe, and Anchor insignia) existed, they were often worn without EGAs. Second, these theater made jackets normally also have theater made First Marine Division patches on them.

WW2 US Mountain Troop and First Special Service Force Uniform Pants

WW2 Mountain Troop Pants

WW2 Mountain Troop Pants

This style of US Mountain Troop uniform pants was worn by members of both the 10th Mountain Division and the First Special Service Force during World War Two.  This particular pair belonged to a member of the First Special Service Force.

This style of pants is prized by collectors today, because of their association with these two famous units.  This pair exhibits a couple of things you do not often see in this type of pants.  First, they are a really big size.  They have a 40 inch waist.  Second, they are in excellent shape and look they were worn only a couple of times.  Most of these pants that are found today, show extensive use and damage.

WW2 101st Airborne Division Screaming Eagle British Made Patch – Two Different Types From The Same Veteran

World War Two 101st Airborne Division Patch British Theater Made Front

World War Two 101st Airborne Division British Made Patch Front

These original World War Two 101st Airborne Division British made patches were purchased last week directly from a WWII 101st Veteran.

I got a call last week from my one of my good friends who is a picker, and he told me that he had just met with a WW2 veteran of the 101st Airborne Division.  He had been a clerk and was a member of the 101st Airborne Division Headquarters.  He was with Division Headquarters through all of the 101st campaigns and was glider qualified.

He had contacted my friend because he was looking for a couple of medals he was awarded, but never issued, for a shadow box display he was doing.  My friend was able to provide him with those medals.  The veteran brought both of these patches with them to the meeting and sold them to my picker, because he had enough patches for his display.  He had obtained them during WWII while he was stationed in England.

I was very happy to purchase them a couple of days ago from my picker.  I love to get items directly from the Veteran because you get all of the history to go along with the item.  As an added bonus, this 101st veteran also gave my friend a photocopy of his discharge to go along with the patches.  Also, like most collectors, I like different variations of items.

The first two photos are of a British made 101st screaming eagle patch with a British made Airborne tab.  Both the tab and patch have a black back.  The second two photos are of a second British made 101st screaming eagle patch with a white back.  The Airborne tab is not British made, but it is the tab the Veteran had with this patch when my picker purchased it from him.

WWII US Mountain Troop Uniform Jacket

WWII US Mountain Troop Jacket front

WWII US Mountain Troop Jacket front

This WW2 Mountain Troop Jacket is a 1942 dated mint original.  It does not look like it was ever worn or washed.  This style of jacket was extensively used by the members of the 10th Mountain Division during World War Two.  This type of jacket featured a large pocket on the back that could be used as a substitute backpack.  There are even internal suspenders in this jacket to help support the load on the back.

This type of jacket is one of the harder to find WWII Mountain Troop uniform items.  I was very happy to add one in such nice condition to my collection.

M1C US Paratrooper Rear Seam Helmet with Westinghouse Airborne Liner

M1C US Airborne Rear Seam Paratrooper Helmet

This M1C paratrooper helmet is a later produced M1C than the one that was previously posted.  This is indicated by the rear seam and the olive drab colored chinstraps.  The liner is a Westinghouse paratrooper liner.

This helmet and liner was found together by a picker about a year ago.  This helmet is not identified, but I was still very happy to add this helmet to my collection. It has become very hard to find these helmets in excellent like this one is.